The Crimean Crisis

After yesterday’s shocking events in the Crimean crisis in which a Ukrainian soldier was killed and another fatally injured by Russian protesters the situation is developing at a rapidly catastrophic rate.

troop

Hours after signing a treaty to annex Crimea into Russian borders based on reports of 60% of Russian citizens populating the country, and after Sunday’s referendum, the gunfire occurred on Tuesday.

Though Russian President Vladimir Putin will not simply hand Crimea back, he should smooth over relations and ease tensions with Ukrainian’s and Russian protesters. After many see this as an act of Putin rallying Russians to do the work for him, Russia and all its resources are isolating itself from the rest of the world.

putin address

With condemnation from the United States, Great Britain and Europe with the EU officials also Putin must be prepared to accept reprimands. In order to avoid this Putin could make ‘good gestures’ though handing back Crimea is unlikely. For Putin, many say he is worried about his look to people as a strong leader. For Putin isolation from the rest of the world since building communication with the west and Europe strongly over years past, is something unwelcomed by all. Everyone wants to have strong and fair dialogue with Russia but such actions are going to cause separation. No one wants a war of any kind, including Russia. After building strong communications with all, Russia must repair this bond and again, accept sanctions of some kind.

If Russia can offer an alternative, this could ease a few tensions, even if the upset is too deeply broken. If Russia plans on ‘turning off its taps’ to Europe with gas supplies, this would also be another huge mistake. Europe are a collective whole. They are as one. In times of strife if the gas is cut off, they will be forced to band together to find a new supply. This means Russia will become obsolete in terms of energy provider over time. Europe will find a new source of productivity leaving Russia alone once more.

A police officer and pro-Russian demonstrators tussle with a topless Femen activist outside the Crim

Russia have since shown no real interest to remain a part of the G8 after discussion of possible removal from the group. Unfortunately for Russia, this is one action that looks likely. Maybe this will give them a chance to reflect upon after the tensions pass on its position with the rest of the world.

We have always been supportive of Russia over handling of the Edward Snowden situation and Syrian conflict intervention. This is a very different matter however. Russia, nor any country, can act this way and expect free reign.

It is key to have Russia’s involvement in world affair’s but the mild ‘invasion’ of troops in Crimea to begin with to put pressure on nervousness in the region was not acceptable under international law, which has been broken.

Despite the signed treaty declaring Crimea to Russia, the region still belongs to the Ukraine. Should Ukraine fall into turmoil with no acting official then it falls to the hands of the United Nations/NATO to decide. The treaty is no Magna Carta. It is not worth the paper it is printed on. If Russia want to rejoin Crimea to the Russian regions it should talk and discuss political issues with its ‘owners’ Ukraine. It has to be done legally and not with short options on the ballot paper.

crimea-map

The initial reports have also been stated that Catherine the Great declared should Crimea retain Independence once more, the country returns to the province of Turkey. This was stated under the Ottoman law by the Russian Queen Catherine II herself.

As reiterated, Russia need to be a part of world affairs and discussions, but cannot create these actions of tension and expect no repercussions. If an area/country wants St. Petersberg or Moscow one day when they wake up, can they have it because they want it?  For now, at this very moment, Russia’s priority is to ease the tension with gunfire with sincerity for recent actions in diplomatic terms.

 

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CFR

National Review

The Guardian

Consortium News

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