Who should get a UK honour after Rio Olympics 2016? (If at all)

Who should get a UK honour after Rio Olympics 2016? (If at all)

FF 21 AUG 16 rio knights copy.jpg

After one of Britain’s most successful Olympics to date (with some questionable entries) many are naturally losing their clarity over whether some of them should be given honours from the British Empire.

laura jason

On the double. Trott and Kenny grab golds.

After rows following David Cameron’s exit from number 10 Downing Street with a number of honours reflecting cronyism rewarding his useless pals and his wife’s stylist (seriously) more lunatics have jumped in.

cam

The man who truly hatred Britain. Totalitarian Cameron, The world’s worst ‘leader’ ever.

No more so than the desperation of The Sun newspaper, edited by Tony Gallagher, a no-life virgin with big ears from national propaganda channel The Telegraph when sacked. His band of brothers at the red top tabloid gutter press, full of sleaze, non stories and personal opinion has been highly questionable on the basis of journalism. It isn’t and we all know it. Seems they themselves, do not.

Another numpty Steve Hawkes, a hatchet job writer with no fact and all personal cheerleading “demands” along with The Sun that some of our Rio 2016 Olympians get honours from new Prime Minister Theresa May. Hilarious.

These ‘Olympians’ have no honour and are average Joe’s who have been handpicked to the ‘prawn cocktail brigade’ of elite clubs because the won a medal in a chance opportunity.
Being an Olympian is meant to be about being a sportsman, overall. The moment national propaganda rears its ugly head to distort the entire political, journalistic and social juncture is a constant recipe for disaster.

Why Theresa May, who is already struggling to make her mark as the unelected bureaucrat who lost faith for failing to veto Cameron’s crony honours disgrace, would sully her reputation over some “demand” from a gutter press hack is amazing.

Mrs. May must not be the caving rock that crumbles to fandom convention. Since when was she The Sun’s b*tch, anyway? A leader does not follow.

obe

Trinket. What an OBE looks like.

On the ‘newspaper’s side of things, The Sun has always been questionable journalism since its new stance of the last four years with untalented caretaker journalists thinking they are good enough. Proprietor Rupert Murdoch is dumb enough to think it can work. Murdoch has lost his edge on figuring out how to sell papers and have a level of media respect, all lost by recent headlines full of sleaze, vulgarity and opinionated drivel.

If any, there are only a handful who deserve honours and not so great, either. Everyone loses their mind when the Olympics comes along and a moment of cheerleading jamboree for Olympic winners will further discredit the honours system as well as Britain as a nation. These people really have done nothing except participate in games as sportsmen.

The lunacy does not reward the people it intended to and is therefore a broken system.

The only way to retain credibility is to really value and accept those who do make extraordinary feats. The days of climbing Mount Everest, Sailing around the world or achieving something monumental in societal communities often forgotten has created more ‘enemies’ of the British Establishment than it has ‘honoured’ and is there hogwash.
These equivalents of benefit handouts with a broken elite will further alienate the public from the establishment and divide the honours lineage filled with crony’s.

daley.0

Pants, calendars and media attention = failure.

Even failed diver Tom Daley is being put up by the press for an OBE. The token gay man in skimpy pants who finished in last place failing to qualify in the men’s 10m diving board proves that rewarding failure with high accolades continues the prawn cocktail brigade of elite club nobodies undeserving of recognition.

Not to mention the honour will also add more intensified, unnecessary pressure on the athletes in sport and generally to live up to such roles as young and developing ‘role models’ for others.

t may

The end result is clear. Should Theresa May lose her mind and cave in it will undermine her, her next four years as unelected follower, the British Establishment, the honours system and society at large. Theresa May claims she will reward all those deserving of honours but has failed to honour the most obvious of people doing good for the country. So every time an Olympian wins something, they are going to get some random trinket from Britain which proves they have never done anything to earn it, not to mention being funded by the National Lottery players in secret as a secret con job?

mo
Most are more obsessed with being media personalities and seeking famedom with the outdated press. This is no honour. Not to mention national treason from the press for abandoning their position and infiltrating the honours system breaking journalistic and moral code. They are not allowed to be instigating or influencing these establishment and political decisions. Back in the day they would be locked up in the Tower. They should be reprimanded by Mrs May. she has much to do, and falling silent on such issues will only hammer her reputation further. She has a chance to prove she can sort out Britain’s mess and is currently flagging in the wind.

If any, the only people (Olympians) deserving of Knightoods are as follows :-.

Laura Trott (MBE)
Jason Kenny (MBE)
Jade Jones (MBE)
Mo Farah (CBE)
Jessica Ennis-Hill (CBE)
Adam Peaty (MBE)
Jonny Brownlee (OBE)
Adam Brownlee (OBE)
Bradley Wiggins (Sir)
Nicola Adams (MBE)

Christine Ohuruogu (CBE)

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Worchester Regiment

Daily Mirror

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London 2012, Day 15 Results

London 2012, Day 15 Results:

Plymouth plunderer plucks proud Bronze

Diving, 10m Platform

It was encouraging to see FINA take our concerns seriously, as markings seemed to change credibly, however the question would be how long would it be maintained for?

Round 1 of the dives were very accurate, as Riley McCormack of Canada launched the proceedings, with a 3.0 difficulty earning a valid 8.5 score. Cuban Jose Antonio Guerra also gained an 8.5 score with the same difficulty, which was slightly worse when legs entered the water swivelled to the left.

The majority of the dives were consistent, though when Tom Daley dived for Team GB, cameras in the audience were flashed by anticipating fans which caused a distraction. The flash photography, which is banned when performers are diving caused Tom and the coach to ask for a re-dive. The official rightfully agreed, and an announcement to the audience was conducted.

Is nothing sacred? You are there in the aquatic center witnessing the action live, be grateful to have that, there is no need to take pictures as well as the disgracious abundance to break rules costing all the competition for any competitor. Should throw them out next time.

Daley, David Boudia and Martin Wolfram ended the round highly, with the Chinese competitors, Lin Yue and Qiu Bo.

Round two had competent dives until the last three diver’s caused a mix. David Boudia earned 9.0 which should have had 9.5 as an excellent dive came through, with a minimal glitch not enough to be a 10. Lin Yue earned 9.5 which was at least a 9.0 with curving’s towards fall in, creating bubbles underneath, and Qiu Bo’s legs were way off into the water entry with them arched over, and gained a 9.0 which should have seen 8.5 minimal.

Lin Yue had some good dives when it counted

Oleksandr Bondar fell back onto his ankles in round three rolling back onto the water with his feet on entry and scored two 7.5’s and an 8.0 which should have been 7.0 – 7.5.

Sascha Klein was unfortunate with some flapjack, saucepan arched legs at a 3.5 difficulty earning 6 and 6.5’s in a trying attempt.

Victor Minibaev was way too out and diagonally extended when flying down to the water which was marked at a disbelievable 9.0 which was a roughly 8.0 score.

Tom Daley performed a tougher difficulty at 3.5 than Minibaev at 3.3 with a slight arch, which should have had 9.5 instead of 8.5 and two 9.0’s.

Boudia dived to 9.0’s in a near perfect splash, which should have been 9.5.

Bou-di-se-a!

Lin Yue entered diagonally to gain 8.5 as Bo had flung his legs and had awkward backward entry as well as his head too close to the board which usually results in a penalty which the judges “missed.” Clearly we can say they missed it in the spur of the moment as an excuse, though was clear violation that they saw it and chose not to reprimand. Disgraceful. Bo scored two 9.5’s and one 9.0.

Round four Nicholas McCrory scored an 8.0 which should have been roughly 7.5 after a mass sviwel bend entry.

Daley had a very good dive into the water scoring two 9’s and one 8.5 which should have seen 9.5’s.

Lin Yue had a disastrous drop which was rightfully marked at 6.0’s and 6.5. Qiu Bo entered the water with a coathanger legged mess which scored 9.0 and two 8.5’s which should have amounted to 8.0’s.

Round five had a great dive from Mexican Ivan Garcia Navarro earning 9.0’s, though Bondar paused in the air and hyper extended his legs, pushing his knees out before plunging into the water, scoring a rightful 5.0 and two 6.0’s, however Cuban Jose had his knees out, as dropped into the water trying to push them then hurled back on his flipped feet, similar to Olek’s mistake, though scored two 8.5’s and an 8.0.

Hmmm…

Minibaev then had awkward bend drops with a swivel back an froth reminiscent of a seesaw scored 8.5’s instead of 8.0s.

Wolfram tore his shoulder on the last dive prior, but wilfully continued on to make his country proud.

Lin Yue faltered slightly with legs off in rotation and a bad entry. He scored 8.5’s across the board, which was 8.0’s at best.

World champion Qiu Bo had a seemingly good dive until before water entry in the dive into position, slightly bent out. 8.5’s were given, which was 8.0 – 8.5 worthy for his blunder.

After the rankings Daley was first with 466.20 to Boudia and Bo’s tied score of 466.05 only a margin separating them as the top three.

The final dive loomed. Bondar gained 6.0’s in a seemingly pity marking which was worthy of 5-5.5’s. Legs were mid-air crossover calamities embodied by the splash dive. ‘Baev scored 8.5 which was 8.0 ideally.

Despair came for Martin Wolfram as he ripped his shoulder in the round prior and continued on to dive in honour for Germany, however painfully irritated the predicament, off in rotations, which probably should have seen him withdraw from the contest, despite not wishing to, as he was too far behind to contend. He attempted a 3.7 difficulty scoring 8 and two 8.5’s for his efforts.

Daley followed with a faultless, perfect dive, with slight bend, to earn two 9’s and a 9.5 which was worthy of all 9.5’s in blatant marking down.

David Boudia followed with an almost perfect dive though a tad off with leg entry, earning 9.5’s which were really 9.0’s at best.

Qiu Bo was over in mid-air and missed fluidity on a 3.6 difficulty, scoring 9.0’s to bump his place to second, after losing to Boudia.

Tom Daley won the bronze medal in a joyous celebration, being thrown into the pool by his team and coaches. Boudia was thrilled as Bo was dismayed.

The event began marking fairly competently, but then instantly reverted after the next few rounds to old habits. Whether “in awe” of Bo’s previous talents, which would constitute as bias, or whether it was some shady politics going on behind the scenes, or just stubborn attitudes of the ‘panel’ or who they believe should win a medal is unfathomable. They should all be struck off, and replaced if FINA are to hold any scope with its reputation, as this has been highly detrimental to the profession and the Olympic sport.

Even defending champ Matthew Mitchum of Australia was eliminated, even though he had better dives than some who did qualify. He was later seen in the crowd in joyous fashion, with a smiley face drawn onto his chest with cheeky tongue pointed out. 😛

One devisery we can take from this is that something untoward is in the water at a cataclysmic standing, where officials need to harpoon the harboured hypocrisy because it is running their integrity and becoming highly debatable in potentially biased parameters that must be recognised and removed. It damages, nations, professionalism and the will of the sport, never mind the Olympics. It applies to anyone and not because it is country based, as before, we re-iterate, if sport is to be fair and contrasting then foul play potentially seen must be investigated and mentioned. If you were on the over side, would you be so quiet?

Gold and silver can be debated by Daley and Boudia. We have previously stated that Boudia yesterday was one to ascend. It is in this writer’s credible thought process that Daley should have gained gold and Boudia silver, slightly but Daley’s last dive proved higher ranking than Boudia’s and in a level of competition, there has to be a mentioned contrast. Again both could be debated back and forth, but clear these two were the top two, and China’s Bo should have held bronze, yet gained silver. While almost every writer will take a defiance based on nationality, there is none here with myself. In order to have a free press and a fair, genuine and defined sporting outlook with morals and sporting achievement, these are valid claims to make. We have no bias when we write, check our previous results, where we have tirelessly put many nations forward credibly, based on their achievement alone in the games. Most press outlets, if not all have had bias towards concentrating on their nations and ignoring others from smaller sports or unknown/politically unmentionable countries. We have done none of this. Nevertheless, we do not wish to detract from Boudia’s victory as was thoroughly deserved with some expert dives on the day. Congrats on a great competition to the end!

Moving on…

Athletics

Make Mo-ne a double!

Mo Farah became the seventh man to sensationally win the 5,000m and the 10,000m at the same Olympic’s gaining the victory for Great Britain in an tense and terrific track trot, crossing the finishing line at 13:41.66. Dejen Gebremeskel (Ethiopia) and Thomas Pkemei Longosiwa (Kenya) took silver and bronze.

Y-Mo-C-A

Men’s 4x 100m Relay

The four man relay runners were unleashed from their starting blocks where Jamaica and the United States (Justin Gatlin, Tyson Gay and Ryan Bailey) had a chase on their hands, though Jamaica (Nesta Carter, Michael Frater and Yohan ‘The Beast’ Blake) strode home with the baton in Usain Bolt’s firm hands to charge home another victorious gold. Former athlete Michael Johnson felt it may have been a mistake to put Bailey in lane three, as needing to gain an upper advantageous lead before Bolt was launched to stand a chance of winning. We would agree. Jamaica entered a new world record at 36.84 as United States raced a 37.04. Trinidad and Tobago came third with 38.12.

Bolt payed ‘omage to the “Mo-Bot” from Mo Farah

Mo keeping up with the Bolt-bot

Women’s 4x 100m Relay

The result was slightly reversed for the females as Team USA strode home to a 3.16.87 time above Russia by four seconds to win the gold. Bronze went to Jamaica’s ladies in a close battle for second at 3.20.23 to 3.20.95.

Men’s Javelin

Keshorn Walcott launched the farthest distance of 84.58 to fling home a gold medal for Trinidad and Tobago, while silver was claimed by Ukraine’s Oleksandr Pyatnytsya at a score of 84.51. 84.12 spiked a bronze for Antti Ruuskanen for Finland.

Women’s High Jump

Anna Chicherova earned 2.05 and a gold for Russia to scale past Brigetta Barrett on 2.03 who couldn’t surmount her rival. Russia also rallied a bronze with Svetlana Shkolina on 2.03 also.

Women’s 800m

Mariya Savinova clocked 1.56.19 to race Russia to another gold leaving South African rival Caster Semenya in second for silver on 1.57.23. Ekaterina Poyistogova came in thirty seconds later to add another bronze to Russia’s victory pot.

Boxing

Luke Campbell, 24, won the 56kg Bantam weight division to snatch the gold medal, leaving Ireland’s John Joe Nevin to commiserate with silver.

Men’s Heavyweight, 91kg

Ukrainian Oleksandr Usyk pummeled Clemente Russo of Italy to plough through to gold success. Usyk celebrated with some funky dance moves.

Time to invite Dhalsim of Street Fighter for a dance!

Teymur Mammadov of Azerbaijan shared bronze with Bulgarian Tervel Pulev.

Light Flyweight 49kg

Shiming Zou won gold for China after Thailand’s Kaeo Pongprayoon was thought to have won the medal. Zou took gold for China as officlas made the call, putting silver around Kaeo. Paddy Barnes of Ireland and David Ayrapetyan tied for bronze.

Men’s Light Welterweight

Denis Berinchyk (Ukraine) settled for silver as Roniel Iglesias Sotolongo of Cuba won gold 22-15 on points.

Men’s Middleweight 75kg

Japan’s Ryota Murata beat Esquiva Florentino Falcao 14-13 on points to prise gold from the Brazilian. Florentino downed Anthony Ogogo one day earlier, forcing him to collect bronze for Great Britain.

Mexico won the Men’s Football gold against Brazil 2-1.

Russia’s Evgeniya Kaneava retained the Rhythmic Gymnastics with a 116.900 mark to earn gold over challengers  Belarus.

Women’s Mountain Bike cycling witnessed France stride home to gold as silver went to Germany. United States wheeled in at third for bronze.

Germany’s Sabine Spitz

Men’s Kayak Single 200m

Ed McKeever received the golden paddle to win gold. Silver medallist was Saul Craviotto Rivero of Spain as Canada jetted to third for bronze with Mark de Jonge.

The single Canoe 200m race saw Yuri Cheban win gold at 42.291, as Japan entered third while silver went to Lithuania.

Double Kayak, 200m

Russia stormed to first with Alexander Dyachenko and Yury Postrigay to defeat Belarus’s Vadzim Makhneu and Raman Piatrushenka who inched passed Great Britain towards the end after Team GB held second for the vast majority. Jon Schofield and Liam Heath picked up bronze.

Men’s Hockey saw Great Britain lose to Australia 3-1 bowing out of the challenge to win bronze, which Australia secured.

Men’s 50km Race Walk

Sergey Kirdyapkin set an Olympic record at 3.35.59 to set Russia into further sturdy grounf with gold. Jared Tallent came up second to gain Australia silver. Bronze went to China’s Tianfeng Si.

Women’s 20km Race Walk

Russian fever taking over had another double whammy of wins as Elena Lashmanova took gold at 1.25.02 as countryman Olga Kaniskina had a time of 1.25.09. Shenjie Qieyang had 1.25.16 to take bronze for China.

Men’s Modern Pentathlon

The Czech Republic bested China to win gold, over the London 2012 course, including horse riding, fencing, pistol targeting and racing to a finish. Hungary followed in third to get the bronze.

Women’s Volleyball

Brazil bashed United States 3-1 with the ball battalion to gain gold. Japan jumbled over Korea totaing ownership of a bronze medal.

Women’s Basketball

US dropped France for gold as Australia hooped past Russia for bronze.

It wasn’t plain Women’s Sailing for Australia in the Elliot class as one man went overboard, allowing Spain to swiftly pass to claim the gold medal.

Wrestling

Artur Taymazov won the 120kg freestyle grapple over David Modzmanashvili of Georgia to earn gold for Uzbekistan. Bilyal Makhov of Russia and Komei Ghasemi of Iran both won bronze.

Bilyal Makhov of Russia competes against Jamaladdin Magomedov of Azerbaijan

84kg Sharif Sharifov Bilyal Makhov overcame opposition to win gold against Puerto Rican Jami Yusept Espinal 3-1.

Perfect pinfall attempted in London’s Excel Arena

60kg

Working the ankle wasn’t enough for Japan’s trying efforts against Toghrul

Toghrul Asgarov of Azerbaijan felled Besik Kudukhov to silence Russia 3-0.

Taekwondo

Carlo Molfetta won Italy their gold in the +80 standings as Milica Mandic won the +67 Women’s gold for Serbia.

London 2012, Day 8 Results

London 2012, Day 8:

Super Saturday: Six gold beacons

of Great British light

This is Ennis: 2012

The nations sweetheart Jessica Ennis took the day by storm, in the Athletics events to power through, leading the table and reaching out for an Olympic gold medal for Team GB. Evangelic Ennis yesterday added over 4000 points to start strong in Shotput, 200m sprint, women’s bar and hurdles events, with javelin, long jump and 800m to come today. Expectation was piled onto Ennis for the last three years with huge expectations. While she powered through with her determination to win, the media continue to hype individuals in the wrong way, where it needs to re-consider the effect longstanding. Rebecca Adlington had immense pressure onto her, as had Tom Daley to a degree.

Ennis stamped her mark on the games

Next to the girl next door, was Greg Rutherford, who launched into first for the long jump flying into first, with an 8.31m to return gold to Team GB once more for the guys.

Go Far-tha-r!

Mo Farah relayed the gold back to Team GB after a bout of stamina secured his 10,000m victory run to first place, bringing back the sixth in a day now hailed as “Super Saturday” for Great Britain from our Heptathlon heroes.

King, Trott and Roswell

The Women’s team (Laura Trott, Dani King and Joanna Rowsell) over in the velodrome for more Team Pursuit who drove further success home, shattering Team USA in the finals with extraordinary speed. They almost lapped them on the other side in a glorious cycle.

Sophie Hosking and Katherine Copeland began the day’s first victory in the lightweight double sculls at Eton Dorney for the Rowing events. The men continued tradition in the 4 man coxless four vessel where Andrew Triggs Hodge, Tom James, Pete Reed and Alex Gregory rode home with gold also.

Dramatic despair came by INCHES in the lightweight sculls where Brit’s Zac Purchase and Mark Hunter were pipped by Denmark ‘s pair Rasmus Quist (aptly named) and Mads Rasmussen. The Brit pair had to restart after a faulty seat initially. “We gave everything. We tried everything. We wanted to win so badly. Sorry to everybody we’ve let down”, Mark Hunter said. None of the country felt let down by the pair in a tense ride. Fountains of support flooded Twitter and all outlets for them.

The Danish ‘devils’ gave Britain a past-ing…

Mark and Zac for Team GB

The Brits washed away Waterpolo hopes to Hungary, who dominated the event, where our boys in Brit blue put in a good effort since participation centuries ago.

Team GB in 2012

Tennis 

Serena Williams fought Maria Sharapova for the hopes of a gold medal at Wimbledon. Williams won.

Andy Murray and Laura Robson wrote their names in the diary for mixed doubles for Tennis action, as Murray plays R-Fed on Day 9 for the gold.

Women’s Triathlon

Swiss Nicola Spirig took gold foiling Sweden’s Lisa Norden in a gripping end. Erin Densham claimed the bronze for Australia after falling out of contention previously in line for potential gold until the final 200 metres.

Helen Jenkins attempted to win in the event, though was unable to stronger competition on the day. “I gave everything, I’m sorry it wasn’t a medal,” Jenkins added, after a fair effort in the gruelling ground gallop of London’s streets.

Weightlifting

Men’s 94kg saw Moldovian Anatoli Ciricu gain the bronze at the Excel centre. Alexandr Ivanov for Russia clinched silver as Ilya Ilyin gave Kazakhstan the gold medal. Kazakhstan also lifted a world record of 233kg clean and jerk.

Swimming

Women’s 50m Freestyle flung into action as Netherlands own power force Ranomi Kromowidjojo proved the one to beat once more, gaining another glorious gold in the pool with an Olympic record to boot at 24.05.

Today’s Goggle Guru

Aliaksandra Herasimenia finished with 24.28 to earn Belarus a silver. Both poked tongues at one another in alight hearted moment on the podium, keeping competition healthy and fun, as third came another Dane, Marleen Veldhuis for bronze also.

Britta Steffen and Francesca Halsall ended fourth and fifth in a tight battle where Brit Halsall almost beat Germany’s Britta. Only one second separated them at 24.46 and 24.47. Steffen still owns the world record in the race at 23.73 from 2009.

Men’s 1500m freestyle started awry as Yang Sun launched into the water as a crowd member became over excited. Unfortunate for the sportsman, however was highly ungentlemanly in attitude afterwards. Restarting the race, Sun kept his lead in the race, eventually widening the gap to swim home with 14.31.02 to claim the gold on offer.

Sunny Horizons

The next available medal was seemingly Ryan Cochrane’s by a landslide, until Tunisian Oussama Mellouli caught the Canadian for an intense silver battle. Cochrane managed to thrust through and claim silver by a fraction, leaving his rival to take bronze. Cochrane raced a 14.39.63 to Mellouli’s 14.40.31.

Daniel Fogg attempted a race for Team GB, though swept away by tough competition in a trying effort.

Girls jetstream to gold

The 4 x 100m medley relay’s for the females saw Team USA rip through the water with a powerful team of gold medallists each from earlier in game events. Missy Franklin, Rebecca Soni, Dana Vollmer and Allision Schmitt tunnel through to top the gold on the podium with a 3.52.05 setting another new world record in the process. Australia entered second and Japan in third.

Team USA swim to gold

The men took to the same event, where the top three remained, though switched places, as Team USA’s held 3.29.35 in Michael Phelps’ last swim at the Olympic’s earning his 22nd medal, 18 gold overall. His team mates Matthew Greavers, Brendan Hansen and Nathan Adrian also held their own in a strong team unison.

Christian Sprenger, James Magnussen, Matt Targett, Hayden Stoeckel gain bronze for Australia.

Japan fought a tough battle with Australia, who came second and third, respectively. Our one to watch, Aussie James Magnussen, the original goggle guru did not disappoint, as restored Australia to third place among tough competing in the water as the last man in the relay keeping level with  Japan for the remainder, in a tight result for victory.

Kiss the gold

Michael Phelps has ended his games at 22 medals and is now the fuly fledged greatest Olympian and dominant swimmer since 12 years ago. Outstanding achievement no one can remove. Congrats!

The Ultimate Olympian of our time

Congratulations to Michael Phelps!

Phelps was presented with a special trophy ceremony at London 2012 to commemorate his immense career. Michael Phelps – “I finished my career how I wanted to.”